Monday, February 20, 2017

Be Perfect...Be Perfect?...Be Perfect!

Homily by The Rev. Marcia McRae
St. Francis Episcopal Church, Goldsboro, NC; 7th Sunday after Epiphany, 19 Feb. 2017
RCL Year A: Leviticus 19:1-2,9-18; Psalm 119:33-40; 1 Corinthians 3:10-11,16-23. Matthew 5:38-48

Jesus says: Be perfect.
Be perfect? Be perfect!!
If you are perfect, remain standing for the sermon.

What does Jesus expect of us? He tells us: Love your enemies. Pray for those who persecute you. Jesus takes to a whole new level the framework Leviticus gives us for our personal responsibility to live a holy life. AND Leviticus takes to a whole new level how people treat each other. The Jewish Study Bible says about today's reading: God “transforms social legislation into a sacred act.”1
God says how we treat people is holy business, including how we treat the vulnerable: the poor, the alien, special needs persons. Since we are God's beloved children, how we treat others is supposed to reflect God's love & holiness. Our interactions are to be holy & sacred. Leviticus gives us plenty of details about overt acts people can see & inner stuff we stuff inside to keep secret – whether it is cheating an employee of wages or harboring anger. God says: Love your neighbor as yourself.

I find this can be hard sometimes: not because of the neighbor but because of me. I can be so down on myself that treating an irritating neighbor like I treat myself would be easy: I could treat the neighbor with the great disdain I dish out to me!
To love our neighbor as God commands,
we must love ourselves!
How well do you love yourself? How well do you acknowledge you are beloved by God? Try it. Then do the same for the person you have a hard time loving. Acknowledge the person as God's beloved child.
A wise priest taught me this years ago. He also suggested I say one nice thing – something true – to this person I saw every day at work.
What a challenge! But I did it.
I recall not seeing any change in this un-churched person. Over time, I grew to see him as a beloved child of God. Years later, I am dumbfounded to learn he has discovered God AND has joined the church! [We don't always know when the seeds we plant will sprout.]
Living in God's love, we may not know where God's grace will lead us. Leviticus gives us more than a moral compass. The Jewish Study Bible notes2holiness does not refer to superior moral qualities. God's holiness is [God's] essential 'otherness'...”  We are not holy like God is. We are “holy” because we belong to God & are set apart for God.3
Jesus takes this to a new level. He tells us not just to love neighbors, but to love enemies, turn the other cheek.
I remember a young woman in Sunday school telling us a woman had slapped her. She had offered the other cheek. The woman slapped her again. The “slapee” simply left the room in peace.
She says Jesus doesn't tell us what will be the outcome when we offer grace & peace. We know what happens to Jesus: he dies on the cross for us.

Leviticus gives us rules for holy living. Jesus gives us grace for holy living. In our reading from Corinthians, Paul reminds us we are vehicles of God's grace.
You are God's temple.
You are where the Holy Spirit dwells.
You are a vehicle for God's grace to spill over into hurting lives – including those who
slap you figuratively or literally!

When we/you live intentionally aware of being God's holy temple, aware of our potential as God's grace-givers, then we help the Body of Christ function more fully in love & in spreading God's grace.
God needs each of us to make the Body of Christ whole. God has graced us with many gifts & diversity to enhance our unity. With our diverse gifts, each of us helps complete the whole as God's holy people.
As our work for God's vision grows, please ponder prayerfully the mystery of our unity in diversity.

In his book Behold the Beauty of the Lord: Praying with IconsHenri Nouwen ponders the mystery of the church's unity in our diversity in his meditation on the 15th century Russian icon “The Descent of the Holy Spirit” by Andrei Rublyov4.  Nouwen notes Peter & Paul among the apostles. Peter denies Jesus. Paul persecutes Christians until his blinding encounter with the light of God's love. We ARE diverse.  
Nouwen says: “...community is first & foremost a gift of the Holy Spirit, not built upon mutual compatibility, shared affection or common interests, but upon having received the same divine breath, having been given a heart set aflame by the same divine fire having been embraced by the same divine love.
It is the God-within who brings us into communion with each other & makes us one.”5

God does this for our well-being AND “for the liberation of the world.”6 Nouwen points out the icon's “urgent appeal to action...(for the many) in darkness (who) wait for the light of the word of God.”7 

Jesus calls us to work for the liberation of the world.

Beloved Brothers & Sisters, you know there is liberation work to do here to continue Jesus' healing work. Jesus calls us in our diversity to work in unity for the liberation of God's children who are in darkness, living with brokenness.

You know brokenness exists. Jesus knows well our brokenness & our need for each other. A friend from seminary shares this vision of liberating people who live in darkness: “What if we are the church that doesn't confront? What if we become the nurturing people of God? What if we embrace the opportunity for the church to move on the strength of embracing differences?”
Beloved Sisters & Brothers:
What if we are the church that doesn't confront?
What if we become more fully the nurturing people of God?
What if we embrace the opportunity for this church to move on our strength of embracing differences?

How do you, how will you work
to liberate people from darkness?


Bibliography
Dios Habla Hoy: La Biblia. 2da Ed. Nueva York: Sociedad Bíblica Americana. 1983.

Holy Bible with the Apocrypha. New Revised Standard Version. New York: Oxford University Press, 1989.

Jewish Study Bible: Jewish Publication Society TANAKH Translation. New York: Oxford University Press. 2004.

Nouwen, Henri J.M. Behold the Beauty of the Lord: Praying with Icons. Notre Dame: Ave Maria Press. 1987.

The New American Bible for Catholics. South Bend: Greenlawn Press. 1970.

New Oxford Annotated Bible with the Apocrypha. Eds: Herbert G. May, Bruce M. Metzger. New York: Oxford University Press, Incorporated, 1977.

Westerhoff, Caroline A. Make All Things New: Stories of Healing, Reconciliation, & Peace. Harrisburg: Morehouse Publishing. 2006.

1 Jewish Study Bible. P. 253.
2 Ibid.
3 Ibid.
4 Nouwen, Henri J.M. Behold the Beauty of the Lord: Praying with Icons. Pp. 65-66.
5 Ibid. P. 65.
6 Ibid. P. 67.

7 Ibid. P. 69.

Monday, February 13, 2017

Life in Community

Homily by The Rev. Marcia McRae
St. Francis Episcopal Church, Goldsboro, NC; 6th Sunday after Epiphany, 12 Feb. 2017
RCL Year A: Deuteronomy 30:15-20; 1 Corinthians 3:1-9; Matthew 5:21-37; Psalm 119:1-8

Do you want to stand for this sermon?
Say “Yes, Yes” or “No, No.”
Do you want to sit for the sermon?
Say “Yes, Yes” or “No, No.”
[Congregation says “No, No” to stand. “Yes, Yes” to sit. Priest says “Yes, Yes” to stand to preach!]
We have just taken literally some of Jesus' words in our Gospel. At our Diocesan Convention Eucharist, Bishop Rob Skirving asked what Sunday worship might be like if we were to take Jesus literally when Jesus says: if we offer our gift at the altar & remember our brother or sister has something against us, leave our gift & go be reconciled, then come & offer our gift. Our Bishop asks how empty might our churches be?
How complicated might this make our Sunday worship here?

We humans have a tendency to complicate life. [Just ask my husband how complicated I make life!] Jesus simplifies life for us in our Gospel, reflecting the focus of our other scriptures today. All point us to life in community.1
Life in community reflects God's Love we know in the Holy Community, the Holy Trinity.
We hear about covenant relationship with God in our 1st lesson, which tells us this is “something not merely granted, but...won anew, rekindled and reconsecrated in the heart of each Israelite in every generation,”
as Jon D. Levenson says in Sinai & Zion: An Entry into the Jewish Bible.2
His statement reminds me of our baptizing infants, who can later make a public profession of faith at confirmation when they are old enough to speak for themselves. We recommit each time we renew our Baptismal Covenant.
Levenson notes: “Covenant is not only imposed, but also accepted. It calls with both the stern voice of duty & the tender accents of the lover, with both stick...and carrot...[It] biases the choice in favor of life...”3 [Italic & bold emphasis mine.]
Paul's words to the Corinthians speak to life, to positive living in community. He shines the light of God's truth on community: We are a community, a unity. We have different roles within this unity.
God gives the life & growth. God blesses us, each of us, with gifts to bless us as a whole Body of Christ. Sometimes we see clearly our gifts & differences. Sometimes we perceive differently.
Think of the differences between coffee & tea. What do you notice as differences between these 2 coffees? [Caffeinated & ready to drink. Decaf & needs water & to be brewed.]
Notice the differences the same manufacturer has for these 2 teas: DeTox & Joint Comfort are both for health. Notice what's alike: each box has a capacity to hold 16 tea bags. The colors are similar.
I see clearly the artwork & writing on the boxes differ. I was fascinated to discover a more subtle difference as I broke down the boxes to recycle. They look alike, yet their sizes differ.





Like us, each has different characteristics. Like us, each has one purpose: making a positive difference in someone's life. The teas promote healthy living. As disciples of Jesus, we promote healthy living in God's Love.

Jesus offers us life in God's Love. We know life offers challenges. As the Rev. Chris Rankin-Williams preached in his sermon the Sunday after the World Trade Center bombing:4
The challenge of this life is not to stay alive.
The challenge of this life is to stay in love.”
Love casts out fear. We hear God's Love as Jesus hangs dying on the cross for us & says:
Father forgive them.
They don't know what they are doing.”

God's forgiveness tells us much about God, about God's perception of us, & the work we have to do in life as followers of Jesus:5
The task of life is not to get God to love you . . .
The task of life is to wake up to the fact . . .
God already loves you . . . 
[so] go into the world & make as much noise with [this] love that you wake up those who are still sleeping.”
As another source says:
[S]top trying to earn God's love &
. . . start spending it.”6

We grow into God's love, more & more as we gain insight into what God is calling us to be.

We are bearers of God's Love.

We are a work in progress.



Bibliography

Brueggemann, Walter. The Book That Breathes New Life: Spiritual Authority and Biblical

Theology. Minneapolis: Fortress Press. 2005.

Holy Bible with the Apocrypha. New Revised Standard Version. New York: Oxford University Press, 1989.

Howard, Cameron. B.R. “Commentary on Deuteronomy 30:15-20” Accessed: 7 Feb. 2017. http://www.workingpreacher.org/preaching.aspx?commentary_id=3164

Howell, The Very Rev. Miguelina. “The Gift of Reconciliation, Epiphany 6A – February 12, 2017”. Acccessed: 7 Feb. 2017. http://episcopaldigitalnetwork.com/stw/2017/01/11/the-gift-of-reconciliation-epiphany-6a-february-12-2017/

Jewish Study Bible: Jewish Publication Society TANAKH Translation. New York: Oxford University Press. 2004.

Levenson, Jon D. Sinai & Zion: An Entry into the Jewish Bible. Minneapolis: A Seabury Book. Winston Press. 1985.

Lewis, Karoline. Discipleship in Community: Commentary on Matthew 5:21-37”. Accessed: 7 Feb. 2017. http://www.workingpreacher.org/preaching.aspx?commentary_id=3157

The New American Bible for Catholics. South Bend: Greenlawn Press. 1970.

Peterson, Brian. “Commentary on 1 Corinthians 3:1-9”. Accessed: 7 Feb. 2017. http://www.workingpreacher.org/preaching.aspx?commentary_id=3142

Skirving, The Rt. Rev. Robert. Bishop of East Carolina. Diocesan Convention. Feb. 2017.

Voyle, Robert J. Restoring Hope: Appreciative Strategies to Resolve Grief and Resentment. Hillsboro, OR: The Appreciative Way. 2010. “Teaching Forgiveness”. www.appreciativeway.com.


1 Note: I recognized this theme in our scriptures after reading Lewis, Karoline. Discipleship in Community: Commentary on Matthew 5:21-37”. Accessed: 7 Feb. 2017. http://www.workingpreacher.org/preaching.aspx?commentary_id=3157
2 Levenson, Jon D. Sinai & Zion: An Entry into the Jewish Bible. P. 81.
3 Ibid.
4 Voyle, Robert J. Restoring Hope: Appreciative Strategies to Resolve Grief and Resentment. “Forgiveness Forum”. P. 5.
5 Ibid. Voyle. P. 23.

6 Ibid. Quotating Steve Bhaerman. P. 25.

Sunday, February 5, 2017

A Trinity of Life Enhancers

Homily by The Rev. Marcia McRae
St. Francis Episcopal Church, Goldsboro, NC; 5th Sunday after Epiphany, 5 Feb. 2017
RCL Year A: Isaiah 58:1-9a, (9b-12); Psalm 112:1-9, (10); Corinthians 2:1-12, (13-16); Matthew 5:13-20

A pinch of salt in food1, a little light in the dark enhance life.

Jesus says: “You are the salt of the earth....You are the light of the world.” Paul says: We are the mind of Christ. When, where, how?
Notice, Jesus says: You ARE the salt. You ARE the light.2 Paul says we HAVE the mind of Christ. When is NOW.
This is your/our state of being NOW, not something over & done, not something yet-to-be in this bitter, darkened world.
You/We are this trinity of life enhancers NOW.
This sounds challenging. Remember: it takes only a little salt to make a big difference in a recipe, as sermons4kids notes about today's Gospel.3 As salt, we help enhance life for our brothers & sisters in the human family.

In the dark, a little flashlight helps us see. As light, we participants in the Jesus Movement, shine God's love in darkened lives. Having Jesus in our lives enhances the world around us, the lives we touch.

We know hatred & bitterness exist trying to block the light of God's love. We know what this looks like: We see it in our news. What we don't usually see in our news is the Good News: We/you DO shine light in this sometimes darkened world.

Think of the respect for human dignity & the smiles you offer at the Soup Kitchen, engaging in conversations with & listening to God's children as we serve.
This is just one of many ways you shine God's light of love.
Isaiah tells us: When we act as God calls us to act, our light rises in the darkness. God guides us, satisfies our needs, makes us strong, makes us like a watered garden...Then we rebuild...ruins, repair damage so where we are is a place of life where people can live.

I wonder if we are so used to doing this, we don't recognize the positive impact we have. How do we do this?
Isaiah says we do this when we loose the bonds of injustice, let the oppressed go free, share our bread with the hungry, bring the homeless into our house, cover the naked, & not hide ourselves from our own kin. [Some of us know about hiding from our own kin!]

Who is our kin? Some are sitting here. God's family is large & includes all our brothers & sisters in the human family.
What happens when we do as God wants us to do, when we offer holy hospitality? Isaiah says: our light shines.

Why should our light shine? Jesus says: so others may see your good works & give glory to God. We do this for the glory of God, our Father in heaven. We do this for our brothers & sisters to see & know God's love up close & personal.

Human charity, compassion, shining the Light of God in darkness comes to us through the Holy Spirit. St. Paul tells us: Your faith rests not on human wisdom but on the power of God. You have received not the spirit of the world, but the Spirit that is from God, so that you may understand the gifts given us by God.
What God gives us is a gift for us to use & share.
We have the mind of Christ. This makes it possible for us to shine our light where we are. Jesus says: You are the light of the world...No one after lighting a lamp puts it under a basket, but on the lamp stand, so it gives light to all in the house...let your light shine, so...[others] may see your good works & give glory to your Father in heaven.”
Remember the song “This little light of mine”4?
This little light of mine, I'm gonna let it shine.
This little light of mine, I'm gonna let it shine.
This little light of mine, I'm gonna let it shine.
Let it shine. Let it shine. Let it shine.”
Are you gonna “Hide it under a bushel?”
“NO! I'm gonna let it shine.”
[Congregation joins in singing.]

How do you keep your light shining? How do you recharge God's light within you?
Sharing Holy Communion with your Brothers & Sisters here is one way to recharge this light so you can shine!
Ponder this as you prepare to come to God's Holy Table for refreshment & strength.



Bibliography

Bowron, Josh. “You are the Salt of the Earth, Epiphany 5(A) – February 5, 2017”. Accessed: 31 Jan. 2017. http://episcopaldigitalnetwork.com/stw/2017/01/11/you-are-the-salt-of-the-earth-epiphany-5a-february-5-2017/

Dios Habla Hoy: La Biblia. 2da Ed. Nueva York: Sociedad Bíblica Americana. 1983.
Holy Bible with the Apocrypha. New Revised Standard Version. New York: Oxford University Press, 1989.
Jewish Study Bible: Jewish Publication Society TANAKH Translation. New York: Oxford University Press. 2004.
New Oxford Annotated Bible with the Apocrypha. Eds: Herbert G. May, Bruce M. Metzger. New York: Oxford University Press, Incorporated, 1977.
Plugged in and Turned on for Jesus”. http://www.sermons4kids.com/pluggedin.html Accessed: 5 Feb. 2017.
Salt of the Earth”. http://www.sermons4kids.com/ Accessed: 4 Feb. 2017.




1 Idea from: “Salt of the Earth”. http://www.sermons4kids.com/ Accessed: 4 Feb. 2017.
2 The Rev. Josh Bowron, rector of St. Martin's Episcopal Church, Charlotte, NC. “You are the Salt of the Earth...”. http://episcopaldigitalnetwork.com/stw/2017/01/11/you-are-the-salt-of-the-earth-epiphany-5a-february-5-2017/
3 Ibid. “Salt of the Earth”.

4 Idea from “Plugged in and Turned on for Jesus”. http://www.sermons4kids.com/pluggedin.html

Monday, January 30, 2017

Be Attitudes

Homily by The Rev. Marcia McRae
St. Francis Episcopal Church, Goldsboro, NC; 4th Sunday after Epiphany, 29 Jan. 2017
RCL Year A: Micah 6:1-8; Psalm 15; 1 Corinthians 1:18-31; Matthew 5:1-12

Where do you see Jesus' focus in today's Gospel?
On behavior or on belief?1
Notice how behavior & belief intersect throughout our scriptures [including our Psalm], challenging human perspective, human wisdom in 3 distinct settings:
  • Jesus takes the disciples away from the crowd for mountain-top teaching early in their ministry together, building on God's perspective we hear in Micah.
  • Micah gives us a picture of a courtroom where God challenges us to “listen up”2, as one preacher says of today's reading. The 3 simple statements in Micah specify behaviors elaborated in 613 precepts given earlier in Hebrew scripture, as one rabbi notes.3
  • Like Micah, Paul discusses in his letter to the church in Corinth the differences between our perspectives & God's.
At issue among humans throughout the ages are our inconsistent stick-to-it-ness & less-than-clear perspectives.
Notice: Jesus says “Blessed are the people who are X, Y, Z” as he enumerates positive gifts they receive.
Another way to say “Blessed are” is “Happy are” [as I read at sermons4kids, & then researched where the Bible uses “happy”. Among these “happy” scriptures are Proverbs 16:20 & many Psalms: 1:1, 2:12, 32:1-2; 34:8; 40:4; 41:1-2; 84: 4-5, 12; & 89:15].

Happiness may seem illusive, especially when we seek it. We are like a puppy seeking happiness by chasing its tail,4 as I read at sermons4kids, which tells about a particular puppy:

The puppy wags its tail when it's happy & thinks the secret to happiness is in chasing his tail, thinking that surely when he catches it, he will have happiness! He shares his discovery with an older dog, & the experienced dog agrees happiness is wonderful & it's in his tail. He says:
I notice when I chase it, my tail keeps running away
from me.
When I go about my business, it follows me wherever I go."

Happiness, the blessedness Jesus tells us about today, can be part of us. It comes from our attitude.

In school what was your attitude toward grades? Would you rather earn Cs & Ds or Bs & As? [At both worship services the congregation agreed they prefer/preferred Bs & As.]

Jesus teaches us the value of Bs & As: Our Be Attitudes. Be Attitudes challenge us to Be disciples with Attitudes reflecting God's Love & our trust in God's Love, which we know through Jesus' dying for us & rising again.
Through the power & guidance of the Holy Spirit we can reflect God's Love in our actions & attitudes.

How well do we know the Beatitudes? WITHOUT looking at the scriptures on our bulletin inserts, please match up the phrase you hold with its correct other phrase. [We have 16 pieces of paper to match the 1st 8 Beatitudes.]
Parishioners met this challenge working
together with joy & perseverance.
Yes, I have to have a written reference to be sure since I don't know them by heart! I plan to memorize them this week!
Readers: I invite you to match the phrases!
  1. Blessed are the poor in spirit,___
  2. Blessed are those who mourn,__
  3. Blessed are the meek, ________
  4. Blessed are those who hunger & thirst for righteousness,______
  5. Blessed are the merciful, _____
  6. Blessed are the pure in heart, __
  7. Blessed are the peacemakers, __
  8. Blessed are those who are persecuted for righteousness’ sake, ______
1. for they will receive mercy.
2. for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.
3. for they will be called children of God.
4. for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.
5. for they will see God.
6. for they will be filled.
7. for they will inherit the earth.
8. for they will be comforted.

Jesus concludes the Beatitudes saying:
Blessed are you when people revile you & persecute you & utter all kinds of evil against you falsely on my account. Rejoice & be glad, for your reward is great in heaven..."

Our embodying the Beatitudes makes a positive impact on this side of life.

Notice what sounds contrary to rational thinking: “Blessed are the poor in spirit...” As Susan Buttterworth says in her sermon on today's Gospel:5
Wouldn’t it be better to be rich in spirit?
To be poor in spirit is to be open & empty before God...
with...hands, hearts & minds open, free of clutter,...anxieties,
...receptive, available for God to do a new thing.6
Blessed are those who mourn & the meek, who experience letting control be in God's hands. Emptying opens our lives...to grow in grace as God's servants,7 ...as peacemakers...”8 We must be single-minded.9
We must put our money where our mouth is & work for reconciliation & building life in community.

Building life in community differs from building St. Francis into a mega church. Simple actions build life in community.
Think of E.C's preparing coffee each Sunday morning before worship; our bakers' preparing bread for Holy Eucharist; Flower Guild beautifying the sanctuary; our Hospitality Teams' offering tasty treats to share as we fellowship after worship.

Great love & happiness follow simple actions.
We see this in the life of St. Francis.

Whatever Jesus calls us to do, he calls us to do with great love.
Beloved Brothers & Sisters, Jesus doesn't call us to chase our tails.
Jesus calls us to follow him.
Happiness will follow us.


Bibliography
Bible Gateway. https://www.biblegateway.com/ Accessed: 25 Jan. 2017.
Butterworth, Susan. Becoming Peacemakers, Epiphany 4(A) – January 29, 2017”. Accessed: 24 Jan. 2017. http://episcopaldigitalnetwork.com/stw/2017/01/03/becoming-peacemakers-epiphany-4a-january-29-2017/
The Catholic Answer Bible. Fireside Catholic Publishing. Wichita: DeVore and Sons, Inc. 2002.
deClaissé-Walford, Nancy. “Commentary on Psalm 15”. Accessed: 25 Jan. 2017. https://www.workingpreacher.org/preaching.aspx?commentary_id=3131
The Happy Puppy”. http://www.sermons4kids.com/happy-puppy.html. Accessed: 25 Jan. 2017.
Harper’s Bible Commentary. General Ed.: James. L. Mays. San Francisco: Harper & Row Publishers. 1988.
Holy Bible with the Apocrypha. New Revised Standard Version. New York: Oxford University Press, 1989.
Jewish Study Bible: Jewish Publication Society TANAKH Translation. New York: Oxford University Press. 2004.
Jewish Virtual Library. A Project of AICE [The American-Israeli Cooperative Enterprise]. http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/book-of-micah#6 Accessed: 25 Jan. 2017.
Lewis, Karoline. “Commentary on Matthew 5:1-12. Accessed: 25 Jan. 2017. https://www.workingpreacher.org/preaching.aspx?commentary_id=3155
Mayfield, Tyler. “Commentary on Micah 6:1-8”. Accessed: 24 Jan. 2017. https://www.workingpreacher.org/preaching.aspx?commentary_id=3152
The New American Bible for Catholics. South Bend: Greenlawn Press. 1986.
New Oxford Annotated Bible with the Apocrypha. Herbert G. May, Bruce M. Metzger, eds. New York: Oxford University Press, Incorporated, 1977.
The Path: A Journey through the Bible. Ed: Melody Wilson Shobe. Cincinnati: Forward Movement. 2016.
Shore, Mary Hinkle. “Commentary on 1 Corinthians 1:18-31”. Accessed: 25 Jan. 2017. https://www.workingpreacher.org/preaching.aspx?commentary_id=3140.

1 The Path: A Journey through the Bible. Ed: Melody Wilson Shobe. P. 230.
3 Jewish Study Bib le. P. 1215.
4 “The Happy Puppy”. http://www.sermons4kids.com/happy-puppy.html. Accessed: 25 Jan. 2017.
5 Butterworth, Susan. Becoming Peacemakers, Epiphany 4(A) – January 29, 2017”. Accessed: 24 Jan. 2017. http://episcopaldigitalnetwork.com/stw/2017/01/03/becoming-peacemakers-epiphany-4a-january-29-2017/
6 Ibid.
7 Ibid.
8 Ibid.
9 Ibid.